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Chewing Gum Get’s You Moving

Researchers in America seem to have discovered that simply chewing gum after abdominal surgery can help get the bowels functioning more quickly than might otherwise be the case.

They found that in a small study of just 34 patients, those that chewed gum passed gas much more quickly than those that did not.  They also seemed to have a first bowel movement much more quickly. And on average, chewers got out of hospital in 4.3 days; while those not chewing were left for 6.8 days.

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You can find out more at: http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/health/4725054.stm

(Image courtesy: Lusheeta, Own work)

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Linda Parkinson-Hardman

Transformational coach and founder of the Hysterectomy Association. Professionally I'm an information scientist who specialises in the adoption and engagement of digital technologies. I am a writer and author of nine books to date, and I've edited a further seven; phew what a lot for a Thursday afternoon :-)

This Post Has 9 Comments
  1. Many sugar free chewing gums are sweetened with an artificial sweetener called Sorbitol, which can act as a laxitive. This may help-or it may cause severe wind problems, as I experienced when I ate a packet of sugar free sweets last year!!!! I would reccomend a small (daily) bowl of meusli and fruit-I love blueberries- which has helped me enormously.

  2. I had a TAH 20 days ago, and been lucky to have no constipation. I ate high-fibre foods the day before the op, and also went for a swim, which I am sure helped. I have always found that eating a few gummy-type sweets, such as fruit pastilles or kids’ jelly sweets, prevents constipation – I assume the gelatine has a gentle laxative effect. Seems to have worked this time too!

  3. Thank you for your reply Linda,
    I think I’ll make an appointment this time to see her rather than speak on the phone.

  4. 4weeks ago I had a vaginal hysterectomy and anterior floor repair, correction for a slightly prolapsed bladder. I had a suprapubic catheter in for 3 days. It was expected that I would have to learn intermittant self catheterisation post operatively but tests after op proved otherwise. I have had no problems and little or no pain but I have been experiencing a yellowish discharge. I was advised over the phone by my doctor to send in a swab test which came back clear so I presume it is a normal thing to happen. I have no other symptoms. Do you think this is normal.

  5. I had a total hysterectomy just under 6 weeks ago. My scar is completely healed although my abdoman is still very tender. My main concern is my bladder. I did have a slight infection post surgery which cleared quickly following a course of antibiotics. However, I experience low abdominal pain when I need to pass urine and a severe cramp type pain just before I have completed urinating. Apparently the fibroids I had removed were very large and attached in several areas, would this explain the continous discomfort?

  6. I had a total Hysterectomy six and half years ago due to a cyst on the overy and a smear test showing CIN III which resulted in a Colposcopy and cone biopsy. Even though my Gynae suggested I could leave the op to see how thing progressed,at the time I was 51 years old and did not want to wait until there were positive signs of cancer even though the cone biopsy had removed the offending cells. The month before the op I started eating mixed nuts with a little dried fruit every day.
    My whole experience of a Hysterectomy was brilliant. I was up and out of bed the next
    day home on the third day and healed very quickly with no after effects.
    I may be one of the lucky patients, but I put it down to reading all I could before hand, a positive attitude and good diet, and especially THE NUTS. They have so many excellent ingredients I am certain they helped my body to heal inside and out.
    Regards
    Toni

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