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Wellness Picture

A long time coming – Anne’s story

I got married aged 22 and, like many couples, we hoped to start a family when we were settled. So after a few years on the pill we decided to try for a baby. After a couple of years I went to my GP because there was no hint of a pregnancy. Then followed several years of visits to the gynae clinic in my local hospital, undergoing tests and infertility treatment, including surgery to unblock my Fallopian tubes and to remove ovarian cysts.

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Looking Forwards

Don’t be scared of hysterectomy if you are really suffering – Jigna’s story

I am 36 years old now and I was diagnosed with 2nd degree uterine prolapse 2.5 yrs ago. The Dr suggested I try pelvic floor exercise to make my muscles strong to avoid surgery at very young age. (I had 2 kids with vaginal delivery), so I learned pelvic floor exercise from pelvic floor physiotherapist and tried for almost 10 months but didn’t get any improvement in the prolapse. It might have been because my tissues were damaged while delivering a baby.

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Medical Malpractice

What should you do if your hysterectomy goes wrong?

While a hysterectomy is a relatively common medical procedure, there’s always a small risk that the hysterectomy goes wrong and you could face an adverse outcome following the surgery. If you suspect that the doctor who performed the procedure is to blame for your suffering because of their negligence, you may be able to file a malpractice claim and sue to obtain compensation.

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Healthy Heart

Endometriosis and the risk of coronary heart disease

Endometriosis is a gynaecological disease that affects many women. It is a painful disorder in which the endometrium, a tissue that usually lines the inside of the uterus, grows outside the uterus. This not only causes severe pelvic pain during periods but may also cause fertility problems and many women complain of an increase in pain over the years as well.

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Hot Flush

5 ways to help overcome those annoying hot flushes

Your face might turn red, looking flushed. Then, you start to sweat. Others may experience a rapid increase in heart rate, or start to feel as if they are about to catch a slight fever. As uncomfortable as it is, the hot flush is almost inevitable during menopause and perimenopause, which is why we teamed up with health writer Sandy Getzky, who shares five simple things that might help you deal with those annoying hot flushes.

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